Launching A New Enterprise (After Exiting The Business You Led To Success)

When starting a new venture and knowing you will have to invest heavily into a brand or company financially, emotionally and, perhaps most importantly, with all of your time, quite simply, it has to be right. For example, it took two years after exiting The Entertainer to focus on what I wanted to embark on next. Many entrepreneurs expect a lightbulb moment, and for some, this may be the case. However, it is important to note that this isn’t always the path and certainly not the only one. If you approach your startup not as a sprint, but as a marathon, you can put in place the ideas and mindsets that will help you succeed in the long run. By ignoring the rush to market and taking a longer consideration to your prospective venture, it can very often benefit you and your brand.



a book sitting on top of a wooden fence


© Caha Capo


When I was considering

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How to set yourself up for success when starting a new job remotely

For all the ways office workers have adjusted to working remotely during the pandemic, the arrangement can be tougher for those starting a new job remotely. Getting to know the company, colleagues and even the lay of office politics is all the more difficult without the experience of being able to connect with others in person.



a man sitting in a chair talking on a cell phone


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And months after workers were sent home en masse in the spring, many are still connecting with colleagues both new and old completely digitally. Roughly 42% of the U.S. labor force is working remotely full-time, according to research from Stanford economist Nicholas Bloom, and the number of companies announcing long-term remote work are continuing to stack up with time.

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For those starting a new job remotely, CNBC Make It spoke with workplace experts on how you can set yourself up for success.

First off, celebrate your new job

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What You Should Know Before Starting A Telehealth Business

Partner, Director of Strategy & Insights at RUNNER Agency

The calls began to trickle in around May this year. What started as a few leads here and there has grown into a steady stream of physicians and entrepreneurs looking to start telehealth businesses across many different specialties.

I began to notice some common themes around patient acquisition in these conversations. In many cases, there was a false expectation that the current groundswell of patient and industry enthusiasm was enough. What we could observe, as marketing experts, was increased competition, investment and exploration in a rapidly growing industry. Without an unlimited budget, the way to win in this climate is to market smarter.

So here are six key strategies I’d recommend for someone starting a new telehealth business.

1. Understand Your New Competition

Telehealth does level the playing field. If you’re a medical practice, you’re no longer competing against just

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The Entertainer Founder Donna Benton Reflects The Journey Of Launching A New Brand

When starting a new venture and knowing you will have to invest heavily into a brand or company financially, emotionally and, perhaps most importantly, with all of your time, quite simply, it has to be right. For example, it took two years after exiting The Entertainer to focus on what I wanted to embark on next. Many entrepreneurs expect a lightbulb moment, and for some, this may be the case. However, it is important to note that this isn’t always the path and certainly not the only one. If you approach your startup not as a sprint, but as a marathon, you can put in place the ideas and mindsets that will help you succeed in the long run. By ignoring the rush to market and taking a longer consideration to your prospective venture, it can very often benefit you and your brand.



a girl in a pink blanket


© Caha Capo


When I was considering

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‘I’ve started a business in my fifties to fight dementia’

As part of our CEO Secrets series, which invites entrepreneurs to share their advice, we are focusing on businesses that have launched during lockdown. Each week we will look at a different type of person. This week we speak to female entrepreneurs aged over 50.

“If you feel it, just do it,” is the advice of Feyi Raimi-Abraham.

“Don’t stop and wait to have all the ducks in a row for your business idea, because it will never happen.”

The south Londoner has started her first commercial venture at the age of 52.

It is called The Black Dementia Company and it stems from personal experience.

During lockdown she was put on furlough from her job as a community education co-ordinator with a national charity. She became a full-time carer for her mother, who has dementia.



a woman sitting at a table with a laptop and smiling at the camera: Feyi's business was inspired by time spent looking after her mother


© Feyi
Feyi’s business was inspired by time spent looking after her mother

People

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Pfizer will start testing its coronavirus vaccine on children as young as 12, a crucial step to bringing the shot to more people



a woman in glasses looking at the camera: Steve Parsons-WPA Pool/Getty Images


© Steve Parsons-WPA Pool/Getty Images
Steve Parsons-WPA Pool/Getty Images

  • Pfizer is expanding its massive coronavirus vaccine clinical trial, opening the study to include children as young as 12.
  • The company is poised to become the first major drugmaker to start testing a COVID-19 shot in kids in a large-scale study.
  • The New York pharma giant said it got permission to boost the study’s overall size to as many as 48,400 volunteers.
  • Pfizer broadened the study last month to include 16- and 17-year-olds as well as people with HIV, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C. 
  • While early clinical results were promising, it remains to be seen if Pfizer’s vaccine — or any other experimental shot — can prevent COVID-19.
  • Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla has said he expects data from this study before the end of October. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Pfizer is setting plans to make its coronavirus vaccine

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Companies are just now starting to figure out remote work

As we move deeper into the pandemic, companies are realizing that the remote work habits that are de facto today will likely persist to become a major part of the way they work in the post-COVID world. Technology will play a big role in this new environment, but the way companies rebuild themselves around the technology may be even more important.

That was the topic of discussion at one round table during Fast Company‘s Impact Council annual meeting on June 30. The panel, moderated by Fast Company technology editor Harry McCracken, included Box CEO Aaron Levie, Visible CEO Miguel Quiroga, Threshold Ventures partner Heidi Roizen, Infoblox CEO Jesper Andersen, Pfizer chief digital and technology officer Lidia Fonseca, Emerald One CEO Laverne Council, and Vince Campisi of Raytheon Technologies.

When the pandemic began, much of the focus was on the technologies that we suddenly needed to enable working from home.

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How To Avoid A Bad Partnership In Business

Edmund Lowman is CEO of Slumber Hostel Group, a youth travel accommodation and tour experience provider in Southeast Asia.

A few years ago, I entered into what would turn out to be the worst business deal of my life. But along the way, I learned many valuable lessons on how to avoid bad partnerships.

Below are my tips for navigating business partnerships, as well what to do if you see your deal is starting to go south:

Negotiate.

The old saying, “Hindsight is 20/20,” is absolutely true. Looking back on this, we made so many mistakes that it is no surprise to me the deal went south. A few lessons to keep in mind include:

• Don’t argue with your future partners. Remember, these people aren’t your enemies. They are people you are going to presumably be doing business with for a long time. If you’re arguing and

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How Tracee Ellis Ross’s Company Celebrates Black Beauty–a Business That’s All Too Rare



a person standing posing for the camera: Tracee Ellis Ross


© Credit: Rainer Hosch/Trunk Archive
Tracee Ellis Ross

Pattern is the hair care line she’d always wanted but no one had created–until now.

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As an entrepreneur, Tracee Ellis Ross would seem to have some clear advantages: She’s an award-winning actor, producer, and activist–and the daughter of Diana Ross. Yet her first steps into starting her own business brought her the same frustration and rage that so many founders–especially female founders–know all too well. A few years ago, Ross brought the idea for Pattern, a hair care line for curly, coily, and tight-textured hair, to her contact at her talent agency. “She made me cry,” recalls Ross. “She was like, ‘Why would anyone want hair products from you? You’re an actor.’ ” Like many entrepreneurs, Ross was motivated by her own experience: She knew, from years of trying to mold her hair to society’s idea of beauty–and damaging it

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This Founder Had a Lot to Learn When She Moved to the U.S. She Turned It Into a Translation Business



a woman sitting on a bench: Elisabete Miranda


© Photograph by Melody Timothee
Elisabete Miranda

Elisabete Miranda had to start over again when she moved to the U.S. from Brazil in 1994. She turned what she learned about translation into a business.

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When Elisabete Miranda immigrated to the United States from Brazil in 1994, she learned how a life’s experience can get lost in translation. In Brazil, she’d been a respected serial entrepreneur and vice president of her local chamber of commerce. In the U.S., she felt like one more Latin American woman who didn’t speak the language. “When you move to another country, it’s like you become a stupid person,” she says with a laugh, recalling her first days in the States. “You have to suck it up and do what you need to do.”

What Miranda needed to do, she believed,

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