NCAA presents proposal on athlete compensation

The NCAA is on the cusp of finalizing legislation to allow athletes to be compensated for their name, image and likeness—an expected but historic move.

The governing body of college athletics has presented its latest draft on how to govern athlete compensation to members of the Division I Council, who are expected to approve the proposal at a meeting Wednesday. Formal approval, though, would not come until January. Sports Illustrated obtained a copy of the 22-page document, which details changes to NCAA legislation based on new NIL concepts developed by the NCAA D-I Name, Image and Likeness Legislative Solutions Group.

As expected, the legislation grants athletes the right to use their name, image and likeness (NIL) to:

• Promote private lessons and business activities and operate their own camps and clinics, as long as they do not use school marks.

• Profit from endorsing products through commercials and other ventures, as long as they do not use any school marks or reveal the school in which they attend. They are only allowed to refer to “their involvement in intercollegiate athletics generally,” according to documents.

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