Small Business Development Center sees an increase in new business applications



logo: Small Business Development Center sees an increase in new business applications


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Small Business Development Center sees an increase in new business applications

AMARILLO, Texas (KFDA) -For the past four years, Tana Cox and Leslie Bigham have been traveling around pre-schools and after school programs teaching dance classes with their business Tippi Toes.

A job that has become harder due to the pandemic.

“We were not able to go into our schools, and we’re still not able to go into our schools and teach dance,” said Cox.

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Now, they’re looking into renovating their business.

“We realized that we needed to maybe expand and do something a little bit different,” said Cox. “Still have Tippi Toes but we’re also going to be opening an infant toddler center in the medical area.”

In the last four months many Amarillo residents have decided to start a new business.

“Why are you waiting? Just do it,” said Cox. “Which is easier said than done.”

During the month of June, West Texas A&M University’s Small Business Development Center saw a 40 percent increase in clients trying to start a new business, in comparison to last year.

That percentage excludes those who needed COVID-19 assistance and existing clients.

When it comes to why there’s a spike, the agency attributes it to a theory called post-traumatic growth.

“That’s when you are able to actually change and grow as a result of that traumatic, stressful event,” said Gina Woodward, regional director for West Texas A&M University’s Small Business Development Center. “Is not to say that the event wasn’t difficult for them, it very much was, but they’re able to change the way that they think about themselves and the world around them, and that enables them to do meaningful and innovative things.”

Although the food industry has suffered major losses, many entrepreneurs are not giving up on their culinary dreams.

“As far as the food truck industry itself, we saw a great increase in those you know, individuals trying to start a food truck,” said Shane Groff, business consultant at West Texas A&M University’s Small Business Development Center.

After the month of June, the 40 percent increase reduced to a 20 percent and it has stayed there month after month.

Consulting services at the Small Business Development Center are free.

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