Conservative think tank: Biden proposals would cut taxes for most in 2021

The tax proposals of Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenMcConnell challenger dodges court packing question ‘Hamilton’ cast to reunite for Biden fundraiser Trump relishes return to large rallies following COVID-19 diagnosis MORE would raise $2.8 trillion over 10 years and reduce taxes for most households in the near-term, according to an analysis released Tuesday by the right-leaning American Enterprise Institute (AEI).

“Overall, Biden’s tax proposals would make the US tax code more progressive,” AEI researchers said in their paper.

Biden has offered a number of tax proposals aimed at raising taxes on wealthy individuals and corporations. These include undoing portions of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTwo ethics groups call on House to begin impeachment inquiry against Barr Trump relishes return to large rallies following COVID-19 diagnosis McGrath: McConnell ‘can’t get it done’ on COVID-19 relief MORE‘s 2017 tax-cut law that cut taxes for people making over $400,000, subjecting

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Why a more conservative Supreme Court is bad for small business

  • On Oct. 7, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case involving Ford and whether victims of alleged car defects can sue the auto manufacturer in states outside its home state.
  • Concerns about an even more conservative Court if Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed do not often center on a conservative leaning towards big corporations. 
  • If Ford prevails, it may be the first of many big, future losses for small businesses, writes Sarah Crozier of small business advocate Main Street Alliance. 
  • Forty state attorneys general are arguing against the auto company’s position.



a large wooden bench in front of a building: An interior view of the Supreme Court shows the bench draped with black bunting in honor of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington, U.S., in this handout photo released to Reuters on September 20, 2020.


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An interior view of the Supreme Court shows the bench draped with black bunting in honor of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington, U.S., in this handout photo released to Reuters on September 20, 2020.

Less than 45 days before the election, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed on, leaving her

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Why a more conservative Supreme Court may be bad for small business

An interior view of the Supreme Court shows the bench draped with black bunting in honor of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington, U.S., in this handout photo released to Reuters on September 20, 2020.

Collection of the Supreme Court | Reuters

Less than 45 days before the election, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed on, leaving her seat open to a contentious fight that could remake the Supreme Court for generations to come — as well as Main Street.

A case this week exemplifies the wonky, under-the-radar policy changes that could have major implications for small businesses, who are pinned against corporations that the conservative majority has all too frequently favored. Yet this case has an atypical showing of more than 40 state attorneys general lined up in support of small business, a unique yet critical alliance that is appropriately warning the court of the significant consequences an

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