Biden addresses idea of high court packing: ‘I’m not a fan’

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden says he is “not a fan” of adding seats to the Supreme Court, after weeks of avoiding questions about the idea that’s been pushed by progressives and used by Republicans to attack him.

“I’ve already spoken on — I’m not a fan of court packing, but I don’t want to get off on that whole issue. I want to keep focused,” the Democratic presidential nominee said in an interview Monday with Cincinnati’s WKRC.

Biden argued that the focus should remain on President Donald Trump and Republicans’ efforts to push through Amy Coney Barrett as a replacement for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the Nov. 3 election.

“That’s the court-packing the public should be focused on,” he said.

Biden has expressed opposition to the idea of expanding the Supreme Court before, but in recent weeks notably dodged multiple questions from the media about the proposal, insisting

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Hunter Biden’s Former Business Partner to Be Sentenced after Court Revives Fraud Conviction

Hunter Biden’s former business parter will face sentencing in a fraud case after a federal appeals court on Wednesday reinstated his conviction.



Hunter Biden, Joe Biden standing next to a man in a suit and tie: Former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden depart after a pre-inauguration church service in Washington, D.C., January 18, 2009.


© Jonathan Ernst/Reuters
Former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter Biden depart after a pre-inauguration church service in Washington, D.C., January 18, 2009.

Devon Archer, a longtime business associate of Joe Biden’s son, was convicted in June, 2018 on charges related to his involvement in a scheme to defraud a Native American tribe.

The defendants, including Archer, are accused of pressuring the Wakpamni Lake Community Association, an affiliate of the Oglala Sioux Tribe to issue $60 million in economic-development bonds which the defendants then used for their own purposes, such as investing in their own businesses instead of investing it back into the tribe.

After his conviction, a federal judge in New York overturned Archer’s conviction later that year, saying the evidence was insufficient to

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Supreme Court allows minor leaguers’ class action over pay

The Supreme Court is allowing a class-action lawsuit to proceed from minor league baseball players who allege they are being paid less than minimum wage.

The lawsuit involves minor league players in Arizona, California and Florida. The justices offered no comment Monday in rejecting Major League Baseball’s appeal.

The players first sued major league teams in February 2014, claiming most earn less than $7,500 annually in violation of several laws. A judge had initially allowed only the California players to sue, but the federal appeals court in San Francisco ruled in favor of the players from Arizona and Florida.

“The Supreme Court’s decision to let the class certification decision stand is great news for minor league players,” said Korein Tillery LLC, the firm representing the players. “After almost four years on appeal, the players can now return to the trial court to ensure that Major League Baseball and team

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Court reinstates fraud conviction for Hunter Biden business partner

A federal appeals court reinstated the fraud conviction of Hunter Biden’s former business partner on Wednesday, reversing a lower court judge who had granted his request for a retrial.

Hunter Biden was not implicated in the scheme, which defrauded the Oglala Sioux Indian tribe out of the proceeds of bond sales. But the scheme was committed under the auspices of a broader business venture in which Hunter Biden was involved, and the perpetrators invoked his name to bolster their legitimacy, according to testimony and a consultant’s slide presentation presented at trial. A lawyer for Hunter Biden has said his name was invoked without his knowledge and that he cut ties with the perpetrators when he learned of their misconduct.

Devon Archer,

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CleanSpark Is A Failed Business Roll-Up In A Vicious Court Battle With Its Largest Shareholder – $3 Price Target (NASDAQ:CLSK)

CleanSpark, Inc. (CLSK) claims to provide software as a service, physical controllers, and consultation services to renewable energy infrastructure. This allows the company to have a diverse range of tools and abilities to help a client create a suitable microgrid platform. However, the reality is CLSK’s microgrid business has not gained any traction, and we doubt it ever will.

CLSK was a former OTC traded stock and got uplisted to the Nasdaq on 1/24/20. CLSK has been trading between $2-$3 from early March until early July, which is a fraction of its current price, which closed at $10.40 on 10/7/20. We believe the reason for the rapid rise in share price is due to news flow with buzz words that attract retail investors, primarily regarding microgrids and electric vehicle batteries and charging stations, sectors that have become hot this quarter.

However, its business hasn’t generated significant revenues and its losses

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Why a more conservative Supreme Court is bad for small business

  • On Oct. 7, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case involving Ford and whether victims of alleged car defects can sue the auto manufacturer in states outside its home state.
  • Concerns about an even more conservative Court if Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed do not often center on a conservative leaning towards big corporations. 
  • If Ford prevails, it may be the first of many big, future losses for small businesses, writes Sarah Crozier of small business advocate Main Street Alliance. 
  • Forty state attorneys general are arguing against the auto company’s position.



a large wooden bench in front of a building: An interior view of the Supreme Court shows the bench draped with black bunting in honor of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington, U.S., in this handout photo released to Reuters on September 20, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
An interior view of the Supreme Court shows the bench draped with black bunting in honor of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington, U.S., in this handout photo released to Reuters on September 20, 2020.

Less than 45 days before the election, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed on, leaving her

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Why a more conservative Supreme Court may be bad for small business

An interior view of the Supreme Court shows the bench draped with black bunting in honor of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington, U.S., in this handout photo released to Reuters on September 20, 2020.

Collection of the Supreme Court | Reuters

Less than 45 days before the election, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed on, leaving her seat open to a contentious fight that could remake the Supreme Court for generations to come — as well as Main Street.

A case this week exemplifies the wonky, under-the-radar policy changes that could have major implications for small businesses, who are pinned against corporations that the conservative majority has all too frequently favored. Yet this case has an atypical showing of more than 40 state attorneys general lined up in support of small business, a unique yet critical alliance that is appropriately warning the court of the significant consequences an

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Supreme Court hearing major cases involving Google, Oracle and Ford

A man with the pro-life organization Bound4Life raises his hands in prayer outside of the U.S. Supreme Court on October 5, 2020 in Washington, DC. With 8 justices currently on the bench, the Supreme Court begins a new term on Monday.

Drew Angerer | Getty Images

The political spotlight is shining brightly on the Supreme Court as the Senate weighs the nomination of President Donald Trump’s nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett, but on Wednesday, the court will be all business. 

Three giants of industry — Google, Oracle and Ford — will press their cases before the justices in a pair of disputes that are expected to have broad impacts on American businesses and consumers. Decisions are expected by the end of June. 

The arguments come in the first week of the court’s 2020 term and will be heard virtually as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. They are among the

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