Virgin Australia slammed for serving two-minute noodles to passengers in business class

Virgin Australia is slammed for serving two minute noodles to passengers in business class – as it’s revealed they’ve run out of wine and Diet Coke and could be fully out of supplies in weeks

  • Virgin Australia is so strapped for supplies it’s been serving two-minute noodles
  • High-paying business class passengers have been furious at the lack of snacks
  • But the airlines says the move has been introduced to minimise risk of COVID-19 

Embattled airline Virgin Australia is running so low on supplies it’s been serving two minute noodles to business class passengers, according to furious fliers. 

The carrier has been limping its way through the COVID-19 crisis, is $6.8billion in debt, and is now in the hands of US private equity firm Bain Capital after being sold in September. 

But the drastic cost-cutting measures have gone way too far according to angry passengers who vented their frustration on social media. 

Embattled airline Virgin Australia is running so low on supplies it’s been serving two minute noodles to business class passengers.

A passenger on board a business class Virgin flight posted this image to the Frequent Flyers Australia Facebook group

A passenger on board a business class Virgin flight posted this image to the Frequent Flyers Australia Facebook group

‘We’re starting to see what an airline owned by a private equity firm looks like. Granola bars and two-minute noodles, anyone (while they last)?’ one person said on Twitter. 

Cabin crew have copped a wave of abuse from infuriated customers who have shelled out thousands to fly interstate.

The constant abuse has even caused some staff to take several days off to cope with the stress, according to The Australian.

The newspaper also reported that Virgin Australia is also out of wine and diet cola, forcing high-paying passengers to bring their own snacks on board.  

‘There is a limited amount of complimentary snacks in the supply chain. Without controls in place the snacks will be exhausted in coming weeks,’ a memo to staff dated October 8, 2020, said.

‘To maintain our current on-board offering and ensure stock of complimentary snacks does not exhaust prematurely the following guidelines apply to all flights effectively immediately.’

The only two snacks on offer for business travellers are noodles and granola bars.

In economy class, passengers only receive a canola bar if they ask for it.  

A Virgin spokesperson said the lack of refreshments has been implemented to lower the risks of COVID-19.  

‘This service includes a snack and drink for all guests across both cabins, and is designed to minimise contact between guests and crew,’ they told the West Australian.

‘As travel demand begins to increase we are exploring the possibilities for our on board business class offering, whilst continuing to prioritise the safety and well being of our guests and crew.

‘We are also re-imagining what our onboard catering offer will be longer-term, and are looking forward to developing a new experience to suit customer needs.’ 

Meanwhile, the Queensland government signed a $200million investment deal with Virgin Australia to keep the company’s headquarters in Brisbane until 2030.

In return, the state will receive an equity stake in the airline.   

The Queensland government signed a $200million investment deal with Virgin Australia to keep the company's headquarters in Brisbane until 2030

The Queensland government signed a $200million investment deal with Virgin Australia to keep the company’s headquarters in Brisbane until 2030

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