How consumers can avoid fraud amid big sales week for Amazon, Walmart

  • With e-commerce surging during the coronavirus pandemic, Prime Day and the 2020 holiday season may be the perfect hunting ground for online fraudsters.
  • Business Insider spoke with Amazon’s former Director of Corporate Development Aaron Barfoot, who now serves as the chief financial officer of online security firm Forter. 
  • “Good online hygiene means paying attention and being alert,” Barfoot said. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

It’s a potential nightmare for anyone who’s ever shopped online: checking your bank account or credit card statement to find that a cybercriminal has stolen your identity and run up a huge bill.

During Amazon’s two-day Prime Day sales event and the upcoming 2020 holiday season, that’s a scenario that could become reality for more shoppers than ever before. Former Amazon Director of Corporate Development Aaron Barfoot — who now serves as chief financial officer for online fraud prevention firm Forter — said that

Read More

How To Avoid A Bad Partnership In Business

Edmund Lowman is CEO of Slumber Hostel Group, a youth travel accommodation and tour experience provider in Southeast Asia.

A few years ago, I entered into what would turn out to be the worst business deal of my life. But along the way, I learned many valuable lessons on how to avoid bad partnerships.

Below are my tips for navigating business partnerships, as well what to do if you see your deal is starting to go south:

Negotiate.

The old saying, “Hindsight is 20/20,” is absolutely true. Looking back on this, we made so many mistakes that it is no surprise to me the deal went south. A few lessons to keep in mind include:

• Don’t argue with your future partners. Remember, these people aren’t your enemies. They are people you are going to presumably be doing business with for a long time. If you’re arguing and

Read More

It’s Easier to Avoid Taxes When You Own a Business. Just Ask Donald Trump (and Joe Biden).

For people who want to lowball their taxes, it helps to own a business. That can offer strategies for reducing what you owe Uncle Sam—and make you far harder to audit.

This has long been the case, but it’s in the news again in a big way for President Donald Trump, and a far smaller one for his opponent, former Vice President Joe Biden.

The tax spotlight is on Mr. Trump because the

New York Times

recently reported that it has obtained and analyzed years of his tax-return data despite his refusal to release it. The Times raised questions about his tax compliance, and Mr. Trump derided its reporting but provided no details. The Times’s report hasn’t been independently verified.

Mr. Biden, who has released years of returns, has been called out for employing a tax move the Obama administration wanted to end. In 2017 and 2018 he avoided as

Read More