Cannabis Industry Spotlight: Eminent Consulting’s Emma Chasen on Elevating Plant Medicine Through Education

Emma Chasen

Cannabis educator Emma Chasen has a mission to educate people on the science behind plant medicine, so that they may take charge of their own healing. We love her because she’s really good at explaining scientific concepts around cannabis in a way that is accessible and helpful to the general public. Named one of Weed’s Leading Women by Newsweek, Emma co-owns and operates Eminent Consulting, a cannabis consulting business that offers educational training and craft industry development for cannabis industry professionals and businesses. She helps brands develop educational marketing collateral and ongoing educational programs to further elevate their brand presence in a competitive industry. 

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She also helps struggling and newly emerging cannabis businesses with business organization, and sets them up for success in both the competitive medical and adult use markets. Keep reading to learn a thing or two about her

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Kuwait’s Education Ministry halts visa transfer to private sector

Dubai: The Kuwaiti Ministry of Education has announced its employees will not be allowed to transfer their residence visas to the private sector, local media reported.

Although the ministry’s employees are barred from transferring over to the private sector, four groups of people are exempt from the transfer ban. They include husbands and children of Kuwaiti women and wives of Kuwaiti men, as well as those who were born in Kuwait.

Also exempt are Palestinians with travel documents and technical professionals working in the health sector who are licenced by the Ministry of Health to practice medical activities.

The ministry’s move follows a decision issued earlier by the Public Authority for Manpower on the ban of transferring government workers to the private sector.

The decision to ban transferring government employees to the private sector comes within the government’s plan to dismiss 50 per cent of expats working in the public

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New Fear Arises During Covid-19’s Contingency Planning Season In Higher Education

Leaves are changing colors, temperatures are dropping and, for those currently commuting beyond bed-to-home-office, daylight drive times are lessening as darkness arrives earlier and earlier. It’s fall!

This is traditionally the season chockfull of superficial banter separating those with and without a penchant for all that is pumpkin spice. Remember those days? Those lighthearted days? Seems like a lifetime ago.

Hamilton’s King George sings, “What comes next?” We know it may be hard things. On college campuses what comes next could very well mean quarantines, persistent feelings of isolation and disconnectedness, early closures, overnight shifts to all virtual and, as is always possible during Covid-19, much, much worse. Those are the hardest things.

There are certainly other difficult things for leaders to think about as they are equally important. Also entirely manageable if we work on them together.

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Amherst resolution criticizing Boston-based business groups’ education aid ideas gets push-back

AMHERST – A joint resolution of the town council and local school committee – approved unanimously this week – opposing some of what two Boston-based business advocacy groups propose, to make state Chapter 70 education aid disbursement “equitable,” is getting push-back from the business groups.

Amherst officials say the proposals, if enacted, would wreck their school system with the loss of millions of dollars in state education aid; the business groups say those fears are overblown and the town’s reduction in state aid would only be a fraction of what they claim.

At issue is a report Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education must submit to the legislature by Dec. 1.

This is a requirement of the Student Opportunity Act approved by legislature and signed into law by Gov. Charlie Baker last year.

The DESE is now seeking public comment, through Oct. 16, to assist the agency in writing

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No business ethics for UP Board Class 11 students this year – education

Class 11 students in schools affiliated to the UP Board, who have taken commerce, will not study social responsibilities of businesses and business ethics, as well as the role of businesses in environment protection, as part of their business studies paper this year, UP Board officials said.

On September 18, the Board had adopted a syllabus based on the National Council of Educational Research and Training (NCERT) for Class 11 commerce students. On September 24, through a gazette notification, the state government implemented a 30% course reduction for this pandemic-hit academic year (2020-21) that has seen schools forced to remain closed for a substantial period of the year.

Under the 30% course reduction, social responsibilities of businesses and business ethics, role of businesses in environment protection, were left out from the course for the business studies paper, but only for this year.

Officials pointed out that the state government had

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