Business Leaders Speak Out on Election Integrity

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Tech, finance, media and other executives are calling on Americans to stay cool during a heated election season. “The health of our economy and markets depends on the strength of our democracy,” the LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman said in a statement signed by more than 50 business leaders, provided first to DealBook. The group, convened by the Leadership Now Project, also includes Eddie Fishman, the chief operating officer of D.E. Shaw; Seth Klarman, the C.E.O. of Baupost Group; Lisa Lewin, the C.E.O. of General Assembly; Marissa Mayer, the former Yahoo and Google executive; and Alan Patricof, the founder of Apax and Greycroft.

The executives expressed support for three key principles:

• “Every vote will be counted,” and election officials should “encourage patience” during potentially protracted counts of absentee ballot.

• The news

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What business leaders think about the U.S. election

With only three weeks left before the U.S. presidential election, business leaders are anticipating new policy risks regardless of the outcome. According to the latest PwC US Pulse Survey, which polled 537 U.S. C-suite and other executives between September 30 and October 6, respondents are most concerned about changes in tax policy, followed by the federal government’s response to the global pandemic. In some respects, the two issues are interrelated, as the question of how to fund recovery efforts looms.

The survey also revealed that executives are significantly more likely to be concerned about tax policy changes under a Biden administration (62 percent) than under a second Trump administration (39 percent). However, most respondents (76 percent) agree that business tax rates will rise to pay for COVID-19 relief regardless of which party controls Congress, up from 70 percent who expressed the same sentiment in early September.

Meanwhile, tax directors are

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Meet the Central Florida candidates in the general election

Here is a look at the candidates in key races across Central Florida.

To read more about them and other election issues, including the constitutional amendments, go to orlandosentinel.com/2020 and click on the online Voters Guide.

Congress

District 7

Rep. Stephanie Murphy, 42, of Winter Park, a two-term U.S. congresswoman, cited her effectiveness and bipartisanship over her two terms in office, including her work ending the ban on federal gun violence research.

Leo Valentín, 35, of Orlando, a radiology doctor, stressed his medical background and said health care, including removing government from health care decisions, is his biggest issue.

District 9

Rep. Darren Soto, 42 of Kissimmee is a two-term U.S. congressman and the first Florida representative of Puerto Rican descent. Soto, a Democrat, said the next Congress will need to help in the coronavirus response and said he wants to pass a $1.5 trillion nationwide infrastructure package.

William Olson,

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Election Watch: 2 Stocks to Buy in November

It seems fair to say at this point that the upcoming election is a bit divisive. When looking at stocks, it’s helpful to put political persuasions aside and seek out companies that won’t get drawn up in the volatility and debate.

Keep an eye on sports betting

It’s not going away. Neither party has done much of anything to impede the spread of states legalizing sports betting. DraftKings (NASDAQ:DKNG) and Penn National Gaming (NASDAQ:PENN) offer compelling access to an industry that is in the very early stages of realizing its full revenue potential. With professional golf’s Masters Tournament set to be held in November, an NFL season that seems likely to carry all the way through, and the pending return of more college football teams in October, there are some big betting opportunities that will roll through the fall and into winter. It’s a market that can avoid the political

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A chief investment strategist explains why making short-term bets ahead of the election is a risky strategy



a man talking on a cell phone: Johannes Eisele/Getty Images


© Johannes Eisele/Getty Images
Johannes Eisele/Getty Images

  • A Charles Schwab chief investment strategist explained why making short-term bets ahead of the election is a risky strategy.
  • In the span of the last 30 election cycles, there have been a range of significant impacts on market performance that had “little-to-no relationship” with the incumbent party in the White House, the strategist, Liz Ann Sonders, noted.
  • Considering the multitude of market outcomes in every election cycle, she said “the economy impacts elections more than elections impact the economy.”
  • Investors looking for clear connections between the election and market performance cannot expect easy answers, she said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Betting on election outcomes is risky as history makes it clear that the relationship between politics and the stock market is varied and absent of consistency, according to a chief investment strategist at Charles Schwab, Liz Ann Sonders.

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Global Arena Holdings Subsidiary Global Election Services Engages DigitalAMN for Strategic Advisory

New York, NY – (
NewMediaWire ) – October 9, 2020 – Global Arena Holding, Inc. (the “Company”) (OTC PINK:  GAHC ) a growth oriented, acquisition minded Company, focused on specific niche markets offering exponential growth — is pleased to announce that its subsidiary, Global Election Services, Inc. (“GES”) has entered into a strategic advisory agreement with Digital Asset Monetary Network, Inc. (DigitalAMN), to help further the deployment of the GES’ business model.

Currently, GES is internally preparing its application to the Election Assistance Commission. If approved, GES would then have the ability to provide election services to municipal jurisdictions in states using absentee and mail-in ballots for their government elections. GES’ proprietary registration and tabulation system helps to mitigate fraud and outside interference, while allowing Americans voters to continue practicing social distancing during times of pandemic, confidently knowing that their votes ballots are being counted. 

DigitalAMN ( OTCMKTS: DATI

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How 2020’s Pandemic And Election Are Impacting Women’s Small Business

October is National Women’s Small Business Month, meaning this is the time we should be celebrating the success and accomplishments of women business owners everywhere. But this October, small business owners are feeling anything but celebratory. The pandemic has wreaked havoc on businesses of all size, and women owners are feeling the devastation of COVID-19.

A recent study of 522 women small business owners across the 15 most populous states found 54% feared they’d have to close their doors for good because of COVID-19.

The study, commissioned by Groupon and conducted by OnePoll, aimed to understand how women small business owners are meeting the challenges COVID-19 presents. Not surprisingly, 75% of women-owned small businesses have been negatively impacted by the pandemic. A fifth said they either plan to or already

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White House down – Covid upturns the US election (again): the 9 October Guardian Weekly

Video: Undecided voters ‘clear losers’ from chaotic first US presidential debate (France 24)

Undecided voters ‘clear losers’ from chaotic first US presidential debate

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

The old adage is that a week is a long time in politics – this year’s US election is making a day in politics feel like an eternity. Since we went to press last week, hot off revelations about Donald Trump’s tax returns, we witnessed the miserable spectacle of the first presidential debate in Cleveland. That event – an international embarrassment for the US – was quickly overshadowed a few days later by the news that the president and his wife, Melania, had both tested positive for coronavirus.



Photograph: GNM


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: GNM

The resulting chaos – a four-day stay in hospital, many of Trump’s inner circle also testing positive and the still-ill Trump’s supposedly triumphal return to the White

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