Duke Energy (DUK) Announces Long-Term Clean Energy Plan

Duke Energy Corp. DUK recently unveiled its long-term investment plan along with increasing its current five-year capital target and clean energy projections at the company’s inaugural environmental, social and governance (ESG) day. This comes at a high time when a handful of Utilities across the board are steadily ramping up their carbon-dioxide (CO2) emission reduction goals.

The company now forecasts that its current five-year capital plan will increase by about $2 billion to approximately $58 billion.

Details of the Long-Term Plan

Duke Energy’s recently-announced plan includes acceleration of coal plant retirements in addition to the 50 coal units with capacity worth more than 6,500 megawatts (MW), which it already retired since 2010. The company aims to retire all coal-only units in the Carolinas and reduce methane emissions in its natural gas business to netzero by 2030.

In terms of promoting clean energy, the company now targets to bring its regulated

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Bright idea? Co-op helps home and business owners determine whether solar energy is a good fit

YORK COUNTY, Va. (WAVY) — Friday was a sunny day in Hampton Roads, just like three out of every five days throughout the year. People who are converting to solar are leveraging that fact to save money and help the environment.

The science of solar appeals to homeowner Gwyn Williams, a scientist himself. He powers his 1850 farmhouse in Yorktown with 21st century technology.

“There’s $100 worth of energy that lands on that roof every month from the sun, so the question is, can you harvest it?” Williams said.

For him, the answer to that question was the co-op known as Solar United Neighbors. That’s where he learned about solar, finding an installer, and the new meaning for the term “purchasing power.”

“They can gather about 60 customers at once, so you get volume discounts on panels,” Williams said.

Williams used to pay $5,000 a year for heating oil

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Insider Energy: Exxon’s rough week, mega-mergers ahead, jobs outlook

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I’ve been thinking a lot about that fly. 

Speaking of surprise appearances at the VP debate Wednesday, fracking made a show — Mike Pence repeatedly said that Joe Biden and Kamala Harris want to ban the technology. Harris said they wouldn’t. 

Fracking is a super common method of extracting oil and natural gas in the US, which involves some engineering magic like sideways drilling.  

The technology turned America into a fossil-fuel powerhouse, starting around 2009. It also led to a surge in plastics and chemicals.

As I recently learned, pretty much

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The Law Offices of Frank R. Cruz Announces the Filing of a Securities Class Action on Behalf of Peabody Energy Corporation (BTU) Investors

LOS ANGELES, Oct. 9, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Law Offices of Frank R. Cruz announces that a class action lawsuit has been filed on behalf of persons and entities that purchased or otherwise acquired Peabody Energy Corporation (“Peabody” or the “Company”) (NYSE: BTU) common stock between April 3, 2017 and October 28, 2019, inclusive (the “Class Period”).  Peabody investors have until November 27, 2020to file a lead plaintiff motion.

If you are a shareholder who suffered a loss, click here to participate.

On September 28, 2018, Peabody announced that it did “not expect any production from North Goonyella in the fourth quarter of 2018” due to a fire occurring within the mine.

On this news, the Company’s stock price fell $5.54, or over 13%, to close at $35.64 per share on September 28, 2018, thereby injuring investors.

Then, on February 6, 2019,

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Forecast Business Analysis with COVID-19 impact on the Global Internet of Things (IoT) in Energy Market

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 22, 2020 (PRNews Times via COMTEX) —
The outbreak of COVID-19 has positively impacted the global internet of things (IoT) in energy market. The sustainability of this market is mainly driven by the extensively increasing cyberattacks. Furthermore, the majority of government authorities across the world, are focussing on the implementation of supportive policies that may drive the global market. For instance, in June 2020, the Andhra government set to install IoT devices in medium & small-scale industries (MSMEs) for the energy saving, amid COVID-19 pandemic. This initiative would help to save around 11,000 units per cluster annually.

In addition, due to the critical situation of the COVID-19 pandemic, businesses are more concerned with customer confidence, optimism, and loyalty. Therefore, numerous organizations can go for the adoption of the Internet of Things (IoT) in Energy; and this

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3 Cheap Energy Stocks to Buy in October 2020

Energy stocks have greatly underperformed the market, led partly by the lower demand for energy during the pandemic. The chart below illustrates this by comparing the price action of an energy fund with the U.S. and Canadian stock markets using SPY and XIU as proxies.

XLE Chart

Data by YCharts. Year-to-date price action of XLE, SPY, and XIU.

Today, the energy sector is experiencing a bounce and outperforming the markets. XLE is up 2.4%, while the U.S. and Canadian stock markets are up 0.69% and 0.52%, respectively.

It’s a good time to review cheap energy stocks that have an exceptional chance to deliver nice total returns.

Here are three energy stocks on the top of my list.

Suncor stock

At writing, Suncor Energy (TSX:SU)(NYSE:SU) stock has appreciated 3.34%. So, it’s outperforming the sector. This can be an indicator that it can continue to outperform as the energy sector recovers.

In any case,

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California energy leaders say planning failures led to August blackouts

California’s rolling blackouts this summer were caused largely by a combination of planning failures that led to a lack of adequate power supplies, state energy leaders told Gov. Gavin Newsom on Tuesday.



A deer walks through dry grass beneath high voltage power lines seen from Terrace Drive in El Cerrito in September.


© Jessica Christian / The Chronicle

A deer walks through dry grass beneath high voltage power lines seen from Terrace Drive in El Cerrito in September.


Electricity demand exceeded what the state had secured because of an extreme heat wave, fueled by climate change, that affected areas across the Western United States, three crucial energy agencies said in a report about the outages. That’s in line with what grid managers have maintained since the blackouts happened in August.

Current energy resource procedures “are not designed to fully address an extreme heat storm like the one experienced in mid-August,” said top officials at the California Independent System Operator, the California Public Utilities Commission and the California Energy Commission.

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Boris Johnson’s Wind Energy Plan Needs $58 Billion From Industry

(Bloomberg) —

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Boris Johnson’s plan to quadruple the size of the U.K. offshore wind industry will require $58 billion of investment and careful management of what’s a tricky building process in some of the world’s roughest waters.

The prime minister is targeting turbines with the capacity to produce 40 gigawatts of electricity by 2030, up from more than 10 gigawatts now. That would speed the nation’s shift away from fossil fuels and help it meet a goal of zeroing out carbon pollution by the middle of the century.

The difficulty is managing so many large infrastructure projects at once. Turbines these days are massive, with blades as big as a jumbo jet’s wingspan. They require highly specialized ships with giant cranes to do the installation, and developers compete to hire the few vessels that can do that work. The money needed to build all those facilities will require

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This Dividend-Paying Energy Stock Thinks Its Shares Are Dirt Cheap

This year has been a bit of a whirlwind for Targa Resources (NYSE:TRGP). Like most energy companies, the midstream service provider made drastic changes as oil prices plunged earlier this year, slashing both its dividend and capital spending program to shore up its balance sheet. That put a lot of pressure on its stock price, which has plummetted nearly 65% this year.

However, the company thinks the sell-off is overdone, especially given the significant improvement in its financial profile and market conditions. That led it to authorize a $500 million stock repurchase program to gobble up a meaningful amount of its beaten-down shares. 

People making calculations with a stock chart in the foreground.

Image source: Getty Images.

Bouncing back faster than anticipated

Targa Resources recently provided investors with an update to its outlook for 2020. The midstream company noted that despite the impacts and uncertainties caused by COVID-19, its “overall business performance has been strong.” That leads it

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