Exclusive: Huawei in talks to sell parts of its Honor smartphone business – sources

HONG KONG (Reuters) – Huawei Technologies Co Ltd is in talks with Digital China Group Co Ltd and other suitors to sell parts of its Honor smartphone unit in a deal that could fetch up to 25 billion yuan ($3.7 billion), people with knowledge of the matter said.

FILE PHOTO: Huawei’s new Honor 20 smartphone is seen at a product launch event in London, Britain, May 21, 2019. REUTERS/Peter Nicholls/File Photo

Embattled Huawei is resetting its priorities due to U.S. sanctions and will focus on its higher-end Huawei phones rather than the Honor brand which is aimed at young people and the budget conscious, they said.

The assets to be sold have yet to be finalised but could include Honor’s brand, research & development capabilities and related supply chain management business, two of the people said.

The deal may be an all-cash sale and could end up smaller, worth somewhere

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Exclusive: Huawei in Talks to Divest Parts of Honor Smartphone Business, Sources Say | Investing News

HONG KONG (Reuters) – Huawei Technologies Co Ltd is in talks with Digital China Group Co Ltd <000034.SZ> and other suitors to sell parts of its Honor smartphone unit in a deal that could fetch up to 25 billion yuan ($3.7 billion), people with knowledge of the matter said.

Embattled Huawei is resetting its priorities in the face of U.S. sanctions and will focus on its higher-end Huawei phones rather than the Honor brand which is aimed at young people and the budget conscious, they said.

The assets to be sold have yet to be finalised but could include Honor’s brand, research & development capabilities and related supply chain management business, two of the people said.

The deal may be an all-cash sale and could end up smaller, worth somewhere between 15 billion yuan and 25 billion yuan, one of the people said.

Digital China, the main distributor for Honor

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Exclusive: Thyssenkrupp Opens Books in Sale of Plant-Building Unit | Investing News

By Christoph Steitz and Tom Käckenhoff

ESSEN, Germany (Reuters) – Thyssenkrupp has begun due diligence with potential bidders for its plant division as the German conglomerate accelerates a radical overhaul to sell or turn around ailing business units in the next two years, a top executive told Reuters.

In his first interview, Volkmar Dinstuhl, who oversees the divestment of non-core assets, said the company has opened the books to buyers of its plant-building units and received expressions of interest for its stainless steel division.

Thyssenkrupp

is also open to considering offers for its automotive and remaining industrial assets, said Dinstuhl, who heads up the group’s Multi-Tracks division, which houses businesses Thyssenkrupp no longer wants to own.

“Our goal is to find a solution for all our businesses within the next two years,” said Dinstuhl, the first time Thyssenkrupp has outlined a timeline for restructuring.

The Essen, Germany-based company, which makes

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Long-term and short-term are not mutually exclusive

The coronavirus pandemic and the uncertainty it has caused has made thinking longer term more difficult for brands. With circumstances changing sometimes on a daily basis, many companies have been forced to become more agile and reactive.

Mastercard is ensuring it isn’t simply being reactive by taking both a short-term and long-term view. Its chief communications and marketing officer, Raja Rajamannar, believes reactions to an emergency cannot be “knee-jerk” but must be consistent with a brand’s strategic direction.

“Long-term and short-term are not mutually exclusive. The amount of focus you have at any point in time depends on the emergency at that point, but if your reaction to an emergency or crisis is knee-jerk, is not consistent with your principles, values and long-term strategic direction – that is when you will have a lot of damage to be undone later,” he said, speaking on day four of the Festival of

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