Investors lead push for Australian business to cut emissions more than government forecasts

Major investors and super funds will lead a push for the private sector to make much deeper cuts in national greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 than planned by the Morrison government, including setting a target based on what scientists say is necessary.



a herd of cattle grazing on a dry grass field: Photograph: Mick Tsikas/AAP


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Mick Tsikas/AAP

The newly created “climate league 2030” is calling on investors, insurers, banks and companies to sign up to a goal of reducing national emissions by at least 230m tonnes a year more than the government forecasts by 2030.

It is equivalent to about a 45% cut by 2030 compared with the 2005 benchmark used by the government – the minimum short-term target recommended by the government’s Climate Change Authority for Australia to play its part in keeping average global heating below 2C. They say action is needed now to put the country on a path to net zero emissions by

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Proposal would merge Pennsylvania agencies, streamline government operations

Proposed legislation would merge several Pennsylvania agencies into a single entity, a move its sponsor says will reduce the cost to taxpayers and streamline government operations.

Senate Bill 1131 proposes to merge the existing Department of Labor & Industry with functions from the Department of Community & Economic Development and the Department of State into the new Department of Business, Tourism & Workforce Development.

The bill, which is similar to House Bill 53, aims to help Pennsylvania “better compete in a global economy.” It also creates the Office of Business Consultant to reduce regulatory burdens and help entrepreneurs and businesses comply with state regulations.

“COVID-19 has really emphasized and put an exclamation point on how bad the situation is with the tax burden,” state Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Adams, said at the conclusion of a Senate Intergovernmental Operations Committee hearing on the bill.

“In the midst of all the sacrifices

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Cap Times Idea Fest: Bob Woodward assesses Trump, Biden and the state of journalism | Local Government

Woodward said during his discussions with Trump, Trump consistently emphasized that Biden is impaired and has slowed down. Woodward agreed, in part.

 “He has slowed down a little bit. He’s hesitant on some things,” Woodward said. Conversely, “Trump just goes right to the throat.”

When asked about similarities and differences between President Richard Nixon and Trump and the impeachment proceedings earlier in the year, Woodward was unequivocal: “Nixon was a criminal and a proven criminal. No one has pinned a crime on Trump.”

A big difference, Woodward said, was the component of premeditation.

“A crime, as we know, required premeditation almost always. Particularly political crimes, you have to plot. Trump doesn’t plot. He doesn’t premeditate. It’s all the impulse,” he said.

When Robert Mueller began his special investigation, Woodward said he was pretty confident there would be no smoking gun because “Trump doesn’t think or act that way.”

When it

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Annabelle Southcoat, Government Scientist, On The Positive Power Of Champions In The Workplace

In honor of Mental Health Awareness week starting in the USA this weekend, I’d like to share with a story from another inspirational woman in my network. Annabelle Southcoat is a genuine polymath – someone whose intellectual curiosity and drive for humanity and social justice has led her down so many fruitful paths already. Her story is interesting because she so nearly wasn’t. Her story is relevant to business leaders because she demonstrates the value of authentic adjustments to our inclusion practice and how, with the right champion, we can change the course and direction of lives. Ms Southcoat is now a Psychologist at the UK Defence, Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) a drummer in a band, an innovative thinker and a pussy cat mother. She says,

”I’m also a dyslexic, gay, trans woman (though I tend to just say woman these days)

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UK government extends its job support program

Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak leaves 10 Downing Street after attending a Cabinet meeting on 14 February, 2020.

Barcroft Media

LONDON — The U.K. government has expanded its jobs support program as the country gears up for tighter coronavirus restrictions set to be announced next week.

Finance Minister Rishi Sunak said Friday that firms whose premises have to shut over the winter period as part of local or national restrictions will receive grants to pay the wages of staff who cannot work.

The British government will pay two thirds of employees’ salaries to protect their jobs over winter. Cash grants to businesses in England which are required to close will increase to up to £3,000 ($3,893) per month.

The new program will come into effect on Nov. 1 and will last for six months. The BBC reported that the expansion could cost hundreds of millions of pounds per month.

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