Virgin Australia business class passenger slams 2-minute noodle lunch

A Virgin Australia customer has posted about their in-flight dining experience, after paying $2500 for a business class seat.

The passenger claims they took the photo of the meal they were served, which would cost less than $5 per serve.

Taking to social media, the passenger detailed the offering on board the flight:

“Two course-offering on VA today: Course 1 – Red Wine, Coke no sugar & Snack Bar. Course 2 – fantastic noodles,” the post read.

Followers said the two-minute meal was a “joke” and “appalling”.

“OMG I thought this was a joke but then realised that’s actually on a plane,” wrote one follower.

“That’s appalling. I know it’s ‘first world problems’ but if you are paying for a premium product then you should receive a premium product,” added another.

“Wow, that was my ‘studying for final exams’ meal pack,” wrote another.

The post comes after cabin crew reportedly

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Lunch from the truck: Byron students cook up their own business with B-Town Bistro

The school hosted a soft opening on Wednesday for the B-Town Bistro, a food truck operated by students. Starting next week, the food truck will be open from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, giving students a taste of what it’s like to start and operate a real-life business.

During Wednesday’s opening, a few students decked out sporting gloves, masks and hairnets were in the truck serving pork and macaroni and cheese, or Cajun jambalaya to hungry customers.

Byron Teacher Ryan Radke organizes the student workers during a soft opening of the B-Town Bistro food truck on Wednesday, October 7, 2020, outside the high school in Byron. (Traci Westcott / twestcott@postbulletin.com)

Byron Teacher Ryan Radke organizes the student workers during a soft opening of the B-Town Bistro food truck on Wednesday, October 7, 2020, outside the high school in Byron. (Traci Westcott / [email protected])

Other students were overseeing plastic tubs of merchandise. A couple of the school’s teachers, Ryan Radke and Josh Bernards, were buzzing around, overseeing all the details.

“We’re having some great opportunities for real-life learning here,” said Malia

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