Foreign physicians should be exempt from visa policy change, med groups say

Six major medical groups are calling on the Department of Homeland Security to exclude foreign national physicians from a proposed change in immigration policy.

The American Hospital Association, American Medical Association, Association of American Medical Colleges, National Resident Matching Program, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, and Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research on Oct. 9 sent a joint letter to Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Chad Wolf requesting that J-1 physicians—those participating in graduate medical education programs or training at schools of medicine in the U.S.—be excluded from a proposed rule that would limit how long foreign nationals can remain in the country.

Under the proposed rule, foreign nationals who are non-immigrant academic students or exchange visitors would only be allowed to stay in the U.S. for a fixed time. Currently, people who fall under those categories can remain in the country for what is known

Read More

Business Development Fund set to reform financing policy for SMEs | The New Times

Reforms in the provision of credit guarantees by the Business Development Fund (BDF) are likely after the Parliament’s Public Accounts Committee (PAC) poked holes in the funding extended to Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs).

During two virtual public hearings with BDF on the public finance mismanagement cases exposed by the Office of the Auditor General’s report for the 2018/19 financial year, PAC concurred with the AG that the Fund was not doing enough to support the growth of SMEs.

 

Yet, they said, large enterprises that are not eligible for BDF financing received support they did not deserve.

 

In the first hearing held on September 17, PAC was not satisfied with the explanations given by BDF officials for the mismanagement cases, prompting the committee to adjourn the session.

 

The hearing resumed on October 7 and lasted more than eight hours, during which more holes were poked in the way the

Read More