Pekin council schedules public hearing on proposed business district – News – Journal Star

The Pekin City Council unanimously voted to schedule a public hearing regarding a proposed Business Development District during Monday’s meeting.

“Several weeks ago, we had a public hearing on the Business Development District ordinance,” said City Manager Mark Rothert. “There was some discussion to go back and add in a 1% Hotel/Motel Tax to the BDD ordinance. That required us to go back and re-start the public hearing process.”

A public hearing on the BDD ordinance is scheduled for Oct. 26 at 4:30 p.m., with another public meeting slated for Nov. 2 at 5 p.m. The council will consider the creation of a BDD at the Nov. 9 meeting.

A proposal to seek public assistance funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, through the Illinois Emergency Management Agency passed with unanimous consent. The funding would reimburse the city for expenditures on personal protective equipment, sanitation and safety materials, and medical

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ID Farmers Net Metering Proposal Could Cloud Solar / Public News Service

Irrigation incurs big costs for Idaho farmers that can be offset by solar projects. (David Frazier/Flickr)

October 13, 2020

BOISE, Idaho — Some farmers fear a rate case before Idaho commissioners will throw shade on future solar projects. The state Public Utilities Commission will consider changes for farmers to its net-metering program, which credits producers for excess energy sent back to the grid.

The proposal could mean a lower net-metering credit rate. Russell Schiermeier is a farmer in Bruneau, located in the high desert of southwest Idaho. He has high energy costs and installed solar two years ago. Under Idaho Power’s proposed change, he would be grandfathered in under the current rates, but only for 10 years rather than 25 like residential customers.

“It seems to make a lot of sense to kind of keep everybody on the same playing field, because a solar panel on my house is not

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The GOP Is Pursuing a Public Slaughter Strategy, Known to Some as ‘Herd Immunity’

People are acting shocked—shocked, I tell you!—that the Trump/GOP strategy on coronavirus is essentially one of promoting herd immunity with the possible downside of as many as 2.5 million dead Americans.

We shouldn’t be surprised. It’s simply the logical extension of conservative policies on pretty much everything for the past 90 years—policies that have killed a hell of a lot more than just 2.5 million people.

Republicans simply don’t believe it’s part of the job of government to provide for the “general welfare” of the American people; instead, government—in their minds—should only run the police and the military, while maintaining a stable currency so business can function. Here are some other beliefs driving Republican policies:

+ Government shouldn’t help the elderly avoid poverty—Social Security should only go to those who set aside money during their working years, and be run by private insurance companies, as George W. Bush

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N.J. public unions are enablers of ‘central command’ economy | Letters

Government-employee unions are an economic army devoted to destroying business and industry — unless the business is dependent on government spending.

Here in New Jersey, the unemployment rate is 10.9%. Because of coronavirus safety restrictions, we are living under a central-command economy where the government decides who can be open for business and how they can open their businesses.

No sense of shame stopped the state from raising the gasoline tax 9.3 cents a gallon this month (under a formula triggered by a previously approved road-funding mechanism) during an economic downturn that this government caused. This does not bother the government unions one bit. No matter how bad the economy is, they will get their money.

The government and the media incited the masses with the fear of coronavirus. I think the danger is being exaggerated for political purposes. Through media propaganda and the promise of more compensation from taxpayers,

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Online car seller gives an inside look at the pandemic’s most popular path to going public

Shift Technologies Inc. Chief Executive George Arison didn’t even know what a SPAC was until last year. Now, his San Francisco-based online marketplace for used cars is hopping aboard the blank-check train on its way to becoming public. 

Special-purpose acquisition companies, also known as SPACs or blank-check companies, have been around for decades, but have made a big comeback this year amid the pandemic, thanks to low interest rates and stock-market volatility. Sports-betting operator DraftKings Inc.
DKNG,
-4.51%
,
 electric-vehicle maker Nikola Corp.
NKLA,
-1.36%
,
electric-truck powertrain maker Hyliion Holdings Corp.
HYLN,
-3.94%

and space-flight company Virgin Galactic Holdings Inc.
SPCE,
-3.12%

are among the companies that have gone public via the SPAC route. 

SPACs raise money in an initial public offering, then look to buy businesses, usually within a couple of years. When a SPAC finds a business and successfully negotiates the transaction, the two merge and the

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Space start-up Momentus will go public with a SPAC



a group of clouds in the sky: A SpaceX Falcon 9 lifts off.


© Provided by Quartz
A SpaceX Falcon 9 lifts off.

To make getting into space as cheap as possible, rocket builders try to pack in as many satellites as possible. But what if they’e not all going to the same orbit? Just like you might need to ride a bike from the metro station to get to your final destination, satellites sometimes need a “last mile” solution too.

The next venture-backed space start-up that does just that is going public through a special acquisition company, or SPAC—a publicly traded company that raises money to buy a private firm, often one perceived as too risky to go public through a traditional IPO or a direct listing.

This time around, the target is Momentus Space. The purchaser is a fund raised by Stable Road Capital that trades on the NASDAQ as SRAC, and will become MNT in early 2021. It’s the same

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