Austin Central Library Saves $100,000 Annually with Apparent’s Intelligent Grid Operating System Optimizing 180KW Solar Array

AUSTIN, Texas, Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — To help meet the City of Austin’s goal to achieve 100 percent carbon-free electricity generation by 2035, Austin Central Library (ACL) is utilizing energy management technology from Apparent, Inc to gain 30 percent higher utilization out of one of downtown’s largest solar arrays. Apparent was the only energy management company capable of meeting Austin Energy’s strict grid synchronization requirements, with a hardware and software solution that results in more than $100,000 in annual savings, enough to power 130 households per year. Apparent’s cloud-based, intelligent grid operating system (igOS™) is managing the 180 kW solar array at the library, consisting of 555 325-watt solar panels and Apparent’s proprietary microinverters. The system produced 157.35 MWh in 2019.

“Our team at Austin Central Library strives to incorporate sustainable measures within our buildings,” said Sharon Herfurth, Office of Programs & Partnerships and Division Manager

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ID Farmers Net Metering Proposal Could Cloud Solar / Public News Service

Irrigation incurs big costs for Idaho farmers that can be offset by solar projects. (David Frazier/Flickr)

October 13, 2020

BOISE, Idaho — Some farmers fear a rate case before Idaho commissioners will throw shade on future solar projects. The state Public Utilities Commission will consider changes for farmers to its net-metering program, which credits producers for excess energy sent back to the grid.

The proposal could mean a lower net-metering credit rate. Russell Schiermeier is a farmer in Bruneau, located in the high desert of southwest Idaho. He has high energy costs and installed solar two years ago. Under Idaho Power’s proposed change, he would be grandfathered in under the current rates, but only for 10 years rather than 25 like residential customers.

“It seems to make a lot of sense to kind of keep everybody on the same playing field, because a solar panel on my house is not

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Bright idea? Co-op helps home and business owners determine whether solar energy is a good fit

YORK COUNTY, Va. (WAVY) — Friday was a sunny day in Hampton Roads, just like three out of every five days throughout the year. People who are converting to solar are leveraging that fact to save money and help the environment.

The science of solar appeals to homeowner Gwyn Williams, a scientist himself. He powers his 1850 farmhouse in Yorktown with 21st century technology.

“There’s $100 worth of energy that lands on that roof every month from the sun, so the question is, can you harvest it?” Williams said.

For him, the answer to that question was the co-op known as Solar United Neighbors. That’s where he learned about solar, finding an installer, and the new meaning for the term “purchasing power.”

“They can gather about 60 customers at once, so you get volume discounts on panels,” Williams said.

Williams used to pay $5,000 a year for heating oil

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