Partner visa sponsors will soon need to undergo character tests in domestic violence crackdown

Australians wishing to sponsor their partner to remain in the country will be forced to undergo a character test and have the results shared within the relationship before a visa application can be made.

The government says the new changes will protect migrants from domestic and family violence.

Acting Immigration Minister Alan Tudge revealed further details of the changes, first announced in last week’s federal budget, on Wednesday morning, including that any adverse findings from the sponsor’s character check would be shared with their partner so they can “make an informed decision” about whether to proceed with an expensive visa application. 

The results would include any information that suggests a potential threat of future violence, including past convictions and charges, Mr Tudge said.

Immigration officials, however, would still have discretion over whether a visa application can proceed.

While supporting the sharing of information between a couple, domestic and family violence

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Hard-hit Peru’s costly bet on cheap COVID-19 antibody tests

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FILE – In this April 15, 2020 file photo, a healthcare worker testing for the new coronavirus monitors the results of antibody tests, inside a home in Lima, Peru. Peru imported millions of COVID-9 antibody tests to detect infections, even though they are not designed to identify active cases. Some have been banned from distribution in the United States after being found faulty.

AP

In the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, the harried health officials of Peru faced a quandary. They knew molecular tests for COVID-19 were the best option to detect the virus – yet they didn’t have the labs, the supplies, or the technicians to make them work.

But there was a cheaper alternative — antibody tests, mostly from China, that were flooding the market at a fraction of the price and could deliver a positive or negative result within minutes of a

Read More

Peru bet on cheap COVID antibody tests; it didn’t go well

title=

FILE – In this April 15, 2020 file photo, a healthcare worker testing for the new coronavirus monitors the results of antibody tests, inside a home in Lima, Peru. Peru imported millions of COVID-9 antibody tests to detect infections, even though they are not designed to identify active cases. Some have been banned from distribution in the United States after being found faulty.

AP

In the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, the harried health officials of Peru faced a quandary. They knew molecular tests for COVID-19 were the best option to detect the virus – yet they didn’t have the labs, the supplies, or the technicians to make them work.

But there was a cheaper alternative — antibody tests, mostly from China, that were flooding the market at a fraction of the price and could deliver a positive or negative result within minutes of a

Read More