Trump’s Attack on Diversity Training Stifles Racial Reconciliation Efforts

Ron House, the president of John A. Logan College, did not respond to a request for comment.

The reaction has been driven, in part, by the severity of the penalties. Violation of the executive order by contractors carries the risk of debarment or blacklisting from government contracts, which could put some companies out of business.

The Labor Department has already rolled out a hotline for tips about noncompliance. The department’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs will also require that federal contractors and subcontractors send in for review the content of diversity and inclusion training programs as well as their duration and expense.

Legal experts say they have never seen such demands. The executive order’s definition of “divisive concepts” is exceedingly broad, and the meaning of “scapegoating,” which is banned in the order, makes little sense, said Scott Hommer, the co-chairman of the

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Trump’s children brought Secret Service money to the family business with their visits, records show

On trips like these, Secret Service agents were there to protect Trump’s children. But, for the Trump family business, their visits also brought a hidden side benefit.

That’s because when Trump’s adult children visited Trump properties, Trump’s company charged the Secret Service for agents to come along. The president’s company billed the U.S. government hundreds, or thousands, of dollars for rooms agents used on each trip, as the agency sometimes booked multiple rooms or a multiroom rental cottage on the property

In this way, Trump’s adult children and their families have caused the U.S. government to spend at least $238,000 at Trump properties so far, according to Secret Service records obtained by The Washington Post.

Government ethics experts say that nothing is wrong with Trump’s children seeking protection from the Secret Service.

But, they said, the Trump Organization’s decision to charge for the agents’ rooms created a situation in which

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Experts explain how Trump’s new H-1B visa rules hurts startups

  • The Trump administration announced new rules this week for the coveted H-1B visa program, which authorizes high-skilled foreign workers to work in the US.
  • The changes include higher wage requirements for H-1B employees.
  • Tech companies of all sizes rely heavily on the H-1B program to recruit top talent globally yet those wage requirements pose distinct challenges for cash-strapped, early-stage startups, experts say.
  • “The tragic thing here is that it means that it’s going to be more expensive for new, innovative startups to be formed,” said Sophie Alcorn, a founding partner at Alcorn Immigration Law.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Trump administration this week announced big changes to the coveted H1-B visa program, which allows high-skilled foreign workers to be employed in the US. Among the most significant of the changes are higher wage requirements for H-1B workers, which could even force some companies to pay foreign employees

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Tech groups slam Trump’s diversity training executive order — FCW

Workforce

Tech groups slam Trump’s diversity training executive order

 

Several leading technology trade associations are pressing the Trump administration to rescind an executive order that, along with subsequent memos and guidance, has put diversity and inclusion training at federal agencies on pause.

The executive order, issued on Sept. 22, looks to purge diversity training curricula of concepts that Trump administration says communicate the “pernicious and false belief that America is an irredeemably racist and sexist country; that some people, simply on account of their race or sex, are oppressors…”

The order extends to companies doing business with the government. “Federal contractors will not be permitted to inculcate such views in their employees,” the order states.

The Labor Department’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) issued guidance Oct. 7 explaining the scope, reach and timing of the order with regard to contractors.

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GOP consultants say Trump’s threat to skip the debate is foolhardy

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump’s vow to skip the next debate if it is held virtually delighted supporters but confounded observers who say he risks throwing away one of his last best chances to change the course of a race he is currently losing.

“The president’s threat to walk away from a virtual debate is a power move that seems almost certain to backfire,” said Liam Donovan, a Republican strategist.

“This debate may be the last best opportunity to score a game-changing moment or otherwise hope to impact the trajectory of this race before it’s too late,” he added. “It’s also one of the few remaining speed bumps for Vice President Biden, and Trump would be doing Joe a real favor by letting him off the hook.”

The non-partisan Commission on Presidential Debates announced Thursday it would hold the town hall face off virtually to “protect the health and safety

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Trump’s Covid-19 Stimulus Delay Could Endanger the Economy

Here’s what you need to know:

Credit…Charlie Riedel/Associated Press

Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California and Steven Mnuchin, the Treasury secretary, spoke Wednesday morning about the prospects of a stand-alone bill for airline relief, as President Trump continued to walk back his own retreat from negotiations on a broader coronavirus relief package and to push for more narrow legislation.

During the conversation, Mr. Mnuchin asked about the possibility of a stand-alone bill, as a critical payroll program for airline workers lapsed last week and airlines have warned of tens of thousands of more furloughs and layoffs without federal intervention.

Ms. Pelosi noted that Democrats had already thrown their support behind such a measure and reminded Mr. Mnuchin that Republicans had objected to unanimous passage of

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How Donald Trump’s new H-1B visa tweaks will hurt immigrants



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US visa-Trump-H1B

The Donald Trump administration has made major changes to the H-1B visa programme, which will make it harder for foreign workers to work in the US.

The new interim final rule (IFR) will narrow the definition of “specialty occupation” to include fewer types of degrees, raise wages that H-1B workers should be paid, and shorten the length of visas for some contract workers.

“We have entered an era in which economic security is an integral part of homeland security,” US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) acting secretary Chad Wolf said. “Put simply, economic security is homeland security. In response, we must do everything we can within the bounds of the law to make sure the American worker is put first.”

About one-third of H1-B visa applicants in recent years would be denied under the new rules, according to acting deputy DHS secretary Ken

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