More Alabama students returning to class despite virus worry

Thousands of Alabama students who’ve spent the coronavirus pandemic in virtual classrooms are returning to traditional instruction despite safety concerns and continuing school shutdowns linked to COVID-19.

Schools in Jefferson County began allowing elementary students to return to class full-time on Monday, and additional systems that have offered only online classes or a mix of online and traditional learning will reopen buildings on a full-time basis through next week.

Walter Gonsoulin, the Jefferson County superintendent, said the system planned to stay open unless there is a state or national mandate requiring a shutdown.

“We have mixed emotions,” Gonsoulin told WBRC-TV. “Of course, everyone is still aware that we are living in the middle of a pandemic, so people just want to make sure that we stay on top of the health guidelines.”

As public schools reopened Tuesday in Montgomery, a group of teachers and school workers who contend

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AP FACT CHECK: Debate week’s twisted tales on virus, climate

A review:

CORONAVIRUS

TRUMP, on

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AP FACT CHECK: Debate week’s twisted tales on virus, climate

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President Donald Trump walks out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to return to the White House after receiving treatments for COVID-19, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md.

AP

Sidelined but not silenced, President Donald Trump demonstrated anew this past week he can’t be relied on to give a straight account of the disease that has afflicted millions, now including him. He heralded the arrival of a COVID-19 cure, which did not happen, and likened the coronavirus to the common flu even while knowing better.

The week featured the only vice presidential debate of the 2020 campaign and an emphasis on policy lacking in the virulent Trump vs. Joe Biden showdown of the week before.

Vice President Mike Pence asserted Trump respects the science on climate change when actually the president mocks it, and Pence defended a White House gathering that the government’s infectious disease

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Debate week’s twisted tales on virus, climate

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sidelined but not silenced, President Donald Trump demonstrated anew this past week he can’t be relied on to give a straight account of the disease that has afflicted millions, now including him. He heralded the arrival of a COVID-19 cure, which did not happen, and likened the coronavirus to the common flu even while knowing better.



President Donald Trump walks out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to return to the White House after receiving treatments for COVID-19, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


© Provided by Associated Press
President Donald Trump walks out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to return to the White House after receiving treatments for COVID-19, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)



Vice President Mike Pence makes a point during the vice presidential debate with Democratic vice presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, at Kingsbury Hall on the campus of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)


© Provided by Associated Press
Vice President Mike Pence makes a point during the vice presidential debate with Democratic vice presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, at Kingsbury Hall on the campus of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

The week featured the only

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A Trump-Pence Strategy on the Virus: Interrupt, Distract, Change the Subject

For much of the summer, President Trump argued that Joseph R. Biden Jr. was scared to debate him, reliant on performance-enhancing drugs and barely able to remain upright for 90 minutes because of his purportedly failing health.

That was then.

Now, Mr. Trump is receiving medication to treat a case of a virus he has failed to control, and he has become the candidate casting doubt on his participation in the next debate. After the Commission on Presidential Debates announced plans to hold next week’s town hall virtually, Mr. Trump threatened to skip the event entirely, plunging the two campaigns into a daylong debate over debates.

The president’s central concern: the possibility of a mute button.

“I’m not going to waste my time on a virtual debate,” he told Fox News. “You sit behind a computer and do a debate — it’s ridiculous, and then they cut you off whenever

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Virus shatters Latin America’s middle class dreams

By Adam Jourdan, Aislinn Laing, Maria Cervantes and Diego Oré

BUENOS AIRES/SANTIAGO/LIMA/MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – When the coronavirus hit Chile and abruptly cost Lorena Rodriguez her job, the 47-year-old nanny took a painful decision to pawn her jewelry – gifts from decades earlier – for cash.

    Like more than half of Latin Americans, she worked in the informal sector, looking after two children in an upmarket area of the coastal city of Valparaiso but living comfortably on joint income with her husband of 700,000 pesos ($905) a month.

Then suddenly, worried about infection risks from Rodriguez’ bus journey to work, the family cut her job in March.

Without a contract, she could not receive benefits like unemployment pay or social support, despite living in one of the region’s wealthiest nations. A 100,000-peso ($126) emergency payment from the government soon ran out, forcing her to the pawnbroker.

    “It was a last

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