Grand Central Oyster Bar Temporarily Closes Less Than Two Weeks After Opening



a group of people standing in front of a building


© Nick Solares/Eater


Grand Central Oyster Bar temporarily closes again, citing downturn in business

Less than two weeks after opening its doors for indoor dining service, Grand Central Oyster Bar will temporarily close once more. In a post to Facebook over the weekend, the iconic 107-year-old restaurant announced that it had no choice but to close again, citing a “lack of traffic and business implicitly caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Grand Central Oyster Bar reopened on September 30 for takeout and indoor dining service following nearly a seven-month temporary closure. Despite initial excitement about the comeback, the restaurant hasn’t been able to justify the cost of reopening, given lower foot traffic at Grand Central Terminal from tourists and commuters, according to a spokesperson for the restaurant.

Restaurants and bars across the city have been devastated by the pandemic, and rent in particular has been a sticking point. In August, close

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Wall Street Adds More Gains to Last Week’s Rally; Tech Leads | Business News

By STAN CHOE and ALEX VEIGA, AP Business Writers

Stocks are pushing higher on Wall Street in afternoon trading Monday and tacking more gains onto last week’s market rally, its best in three months.

The S&P 500 was 1.8% higher, following up on strengthening in stock markets around the world. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 308 points, or 1.1%, at 28,895, as of 12:35 p.m. Eastern time, and the Nasdaq composite was 2.6% higher.

The gains are being driven mostly by Big Tech stocks, whose businesses have proven to be practically impervious to the pandemic, rather than companies that would benefit from a strengthening economy.

Apple climbed 5.4% and alone accounted for nearly a quarter of the S&P 500’s rise. Amazon gained 5.1%. Both companies have events coming up this week, with Apple expected to unveil its latest batch of iPhones on Tuesday and Amazon holding its Prime

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Wall Street adds more gains to last week’s rally; tech leads

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street is pushing higher in Monday morning trading and tacking more gains onto last week’s rally, its best in three months.

The S&P 500 was 0.9% higher, following up on strengthening in stock markets around the world. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 165 points, or 0.6%, at 28,752, as of 10:23 a.m. Eastern time, and the Nasdaq composite was 1.4% higher.

Monday’s market gains were driven mostly by Big Tech stocks, whose businesses have proven to be practically impervious to the pandemic, rather than companies that would benefit from a strengthening economy.


Apple rose 3.4% and alone accounted for nearly a quarter of the S&P 500’s rise. Amazon gained 3.3%. Both companies have events coming up this week, with Apple expected to unveil its latest batch of iPhones on Tuesday and Amazon holding its Prime Day on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Microsoft also climbed

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Wall Street adds more gains to last week’s rally; tech leads | Business

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street is pushing higher in Monday morning trading and tacking more gains onto last week’s rally, its best in three months.

The S&P 500 was 0.9% higher, following up on strengthening in stock markets around the world. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 165 points, or 0.6%, at 28,752, as of 10:23 a.m. Eastern time, and the Nasdaq composite was 1.4% higher.

Monday’s market gains were driven mostly by Big Tech stocks, whose businesses have proven to be practically impervious to the pandemic, rather than companies that would benefit from a strengthening economy.

Apple rose 3.4% and alone accounted for nearly a quarter of the S&P 500’s rise. Amazon gained 3.3%. Both companies have events coming up this week, with Apple expected to unveil its latest batch of iPhones on Tuesday and Amazon holding its Prime Day on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Microsoft also climbed

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AP FACT CHECK: Debate week’s twisted tales on virus, climate

A review:

CORONAVIRUS

TRUMP, on

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AP FACT CHECK: Debate week’s twisted tales on virus, climate

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President Donald Trump walks out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to return to the White House after receiving treatments for COVID-19, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md.

AP

Sidelined but not silenced, President Donald Trump demonstrated anew this past week he can’t be relied on to give a straight account of the disease that has afflicted millions, now including him. He heralded the arrival of a COVID-19 cure, which did not happen, and likened the coronavirus to the common flu even while knowing better.

The week featured the only vice presidential debate of the 2020 campaign and an emphasis on policy lacking in the virulent Trump vs. Joe Biden showdown of the week before.

Vice President Mike Pence asserted Trump respects the science on climate change when actually the president mocks it, and Pence defended a White House gathering that the government’s infectious disease

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Debate week’s twisted tales on virus, climate

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sidelined but not silenced, President Donald Trump demonstrated anew this past week he can’t be relied on to give a straight account of the disease that has afflicted millions, now including him. He heralded the arrival of a COVID-19 cure, which did not happen, and likened the coronavirus to the common flu even while knowing better.



President Donald Trump walks out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to return to the White House after receiving treatments for COVID-19, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)


© Provided by Associated Press
President Donald Trump walks out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center to return to the White House after receiving treatments for COVID-19, Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Bethesda, Md. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)



Vice President Mike Pence makes a point during the vice presidential debate with Democratic vice presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, at Kingsbury Hall on the campus of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)


© Provided by Associated Press
Vice President Mike Pence makes a point during the vice presidential debate with Democratic vice presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, at Kingsbury Hall on the campus of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

The week featured the only

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Trump says he’ll boycott next week’s presidential debate

When Donald Trump was hospitalized late last week after contracting the coronavirus, it was difficult to imagine the president joining Joe Biden on a debate stage 13 days later. The Republican nevertheless indicated this week that he intended to participate in the scheduled town-hall event in Miami.

The problem, of course, is that Trump was not only infected with a virus that’s killed more than 210,000 Americans, his attendance at a town-hall debate ran the risk of making others sick. With this painfully obvious dynamic in mind, the non-partisan Commission on Presidential Debates made a sensible announcement this morning.

The Commission on Presidential Debates announced Thursday that the second presidential debate, set for next week, will now take place virtually as President Donald Trump battles Covid-19. The debate will still take place in the form of a town hall, but Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden, the 2020 Democratic

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Earth911 Reader: This Week’s Recommended Sustainability, Recycling, Business and Science News

Every week, the Earth911 team combs news and research for interesting ideas and stories about the challenges of creating a sustainable world. We pick a few science, sustainability, recycling, and business stories, along with ideas you can act on to support the environment and Earth-friendly initiatives. Sometimes it is good news we can all celebrate, sometimes it is bad news or a seemingly intractable challenge that should make us double-down on finding new solutions. We call it the Earth911 Reader and we hope you find it useful.

IN SCIENCE

Data Points To Higher Sea Level Rise Estimates

Scientists can attribute sea-level increases to their source — Antarctica has contributed 0.4 inches over the past 30 years and Greenland 0.4 inches for a total of 0.7 inches. A University of Leeds research study suggests that ice loss is progressing at the higher end of estimates, so humanity needs to be prepared

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